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Why do we call a yard a yard?

The term, yard derives from the Old English gerd, gyrd etc., which was used for branches, staves and measuring rods. It is first attested in the late 7th century laws of Ine of Wessex, where the “yard of land” mentioned is the yardland, an old English unit of tax assessment equal to 1⁄4 hide.

What does yard mean in British English?

yard in British English



(jɑːd ) noun. a unit of length equal to 3 feet and defined in 1963 as exactly 0.9144 metre. Abbreviation: yd.

What do Americans call a garden shed?

Depending on the region and type of use, a shed may also be called a shack, outhouse, or “outbuilding”.

What is the American word for luggage?

Baggage

Baggage is a more technical word and is used for example when discussing airports or travel insurance. In American English, luggage refers to empty bags and suitcases and baggage refers to bags and suitcases with their contents.

What is vacation British English?

British/American holiday / vacation. You use holiday (or holidays) in British English and vacation in North American English to describe the regular periods of time when you are not at work or school, or time that you spend travelling or resting away from home: I get four weeks’ holiday/​vacation a year.

What is a shed called in England?

To me—and probably to most Americans—sheds are little crappy booths some people store firewood or tools in. But in the UK, they have a Shed Week and a Shed of the Year contest and fans of sheds, who go around calling themselves “sheddies.” I wanted to…

Why do Americans have backyards?

Once urban households had running water and water-carriage sewerage, they no longer needed to devote space outside the house to these necessities of life, and they could use that space instead for recreation. Thus, the yard was born.

Are sheds a British thing?

A private place for reflection, for work, for creativity, a shed may not be exclusively British – the Shed of the Year now has an international category. But it remains an integral part of British life.

What is the British word of zero?

“Zero” is the usual name for the number 0 in English. In British English “nought” is also used. In American English “naught” is used occasionally for zero, but (as with British English) “naught” is more often used as an archaic word for nothing. “Nil”, “love”, and “duck” are used by different sports for scores of zero.

What is the American word for biscuit?

cookie

To most of the rest of the English-speaking world, a biscuit is what Americans would refer to as either a cookie or a cracker. Biscuits can be sweet (shortbread) or savory.

What is cookie in British English?

Biscuit (UK) / Cookie (US)



In the UK, these are generally called biscuits, although people do call the bigger, softer kind cookies, too. However, in the UK, people LOVE biscuits (especially with tea) and there are hundreds of different varieties that aren’t called cookies, too.

What do they call diapers in England?

This usage stuck in the United States and Canada following the British colonization of North America, but in the United Kingdom, the word “nappy” took its place. Most sources believe nappy is a diminutive form of the word napkin, which itself was originally a diminutive.

What do they call eggplant in England?

Aubergine

Eggplant or Aubergine



The British have borrowed quite a few foods terms from their French neighbors and none is more well-known than aubergine,known as eggplant in the U.S.. The word aubergine comes from the Catalan word alberginia, which came from the Arabic al-badhinjan and the Persian word badingan before that.

What is gravy called in England?


Me biscuits and gravy sounds exceptionally weird biscuit in england is basically a cookie. And gravy is usually what you put on like mashed potatoes or roast dinner.

What do the Brits call an umbrella?

brolly

In Britain, “brolly” is a popular alternative to the more staid “umbrella.” Sarah Gamp, a fictional nurse who toted a particularly large umbrella in Charles Dickens’s novel Martin Chuzzlewit, has inspired some English speakers to dub oversize versions “gamps.” “Bumbershoot” is a predominantly American nickname, one …

What do Brits call crackers?

In British English, crackers are sometimes called water biscuits, or savory biscuits.

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